Applications open:

June 22, 2022

Applications deadline:

August 31, 2022

Questions?

Contact us at
info@madeforhealthjustice.org

Submit Application

About MADE for Health Justice

Modernized Anti-Racist Data Ecosystems (MADE) for Health Justice is a grant opportunity that seeks to accelerate the development of health-focused local data ecosystems that center principles of anti-racism, equity, justice, and community power.

Through MADE for Health Justice, non-profit organizations will be funded to build and facilitate multi sector teams tasked with creating local data ecosystems. These ecosystems must focus on improving community health, connecting data across multiple sectors of local government, prioritizing the needs and voices of communities oppressed by structural racism, and ultimately drive just and equity-centered decision-making.

Inspired by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF)’s National Commission to Transform Public Health Data Systems, MADE for Health Justice is supported through a partnership between RWJF and the de Beaumont Foundation.

The goal of MADE for Health Justice is to accelerate the development of health-focused local data ecosystems that center principles of anti-racism, equity, justice, and community power. Ultimately, the initiative seeks to identify pathways for creating local data ecosystems that intentionally and sustainably:

  • Connect data across multiple sectors of local government to advance a health equity goal.
  • Utilize and formalize collaborative governance structures and community power building approaches that prioritize the needs of communities oppressed by structural racism.
  • Change and improve routine data operations, processes, and structures to build trust and accountability.
  • Center principles of anti-racism, equity, and justice.

The applicant organization must propose a team that includes, at minimum:

  1. A non-profit organization that will serve as the applicant organization; and
  2. Local government entities (e.g., agencies, departments, programs) that represent at least two (2) different sectors that will serve as contributors of local, population-based data and/or analytical services to the initiative.


As part of MADE for Health Justice, teams will:

  • Pursue a health equity goal that can be advanced with multi-sector, local data that reflects assets and needs within communities of color and drives upstream changes in power, access, and opportunity.
  • Confront organizational and community-level structural barriers to achieving the health equity goal.
  • Connect and utilize available data sources across sectors to investigate and validate structural barriers that inhibit progress toward the health equity goal.
  • Establish and formalize collaborative governance processes. The goals of these processes will be to reveal and change existing power structures, build trust and accountability, and ensure that communities of color are full and formal partners in decision-making across the data life cycle.
  • Make substantial changes to routine data operations and processes within and across local government. Ultimately, changes to these operations and processes should help local data ecosystems routinely generate information for decision-making that centers the voices, experiences, and needs of communities of color.
  • Engage in learning and training opportunities. Teams will continually participate in learning and training opportunities that will inform their efforts to create local data ecosystems that center anti-racism, equity, justice, and community power.
  • Obtain ongoing technical assistance throughout the three-year grant period from the national coordinating office.

Up to five non-profit organizations will receive grants. A grant of up to $1,000,000 will be awarded to each organization to support planning, implementation, and sustainability related to the initiative over a three-year period. Grant funding and activities will begin by June 16, 2023.

As part of MADE for Health Justice, teams will obtain ongoing technical assistance throughout the three-year grant period from the national coordinating office.

Grant activities will span three years. Activities will start in June 2023 and end in June 2026. Awarded funds must be expended by June 30, 2026.

Eligibility

To be eligible for this opportunity, an applicant organization must:

  • Be a non-profit organization that is tax-exempt under Section 501(c)(3) or 501(c)(4) of the Internal Revenue Code, is in good standing with the Internal Revenue Service, and is not a private foundation or non-functionally integrated Type III supporting organization. Colleges and universities, whether public or private, are ineligible to serve as applicant organizations.
  • Possess an organizational mission and/or strategic priorities that focus on:
    • Serving communities of color; and
    • Addressing structural racism, equity, and justice.
  • Engage in community power building activities (e.g., grassroots advocacy, community organizing) or have an established partnership with an organization that engages in this work.
  • Have established partnerships with local government entities (e.g., organizations, departments, programs) across at least two sectors.
  • Be based in the United States, in U.S. territories, or within lands of Tribal entities that are recognized under U.S. federal law.


Eligible organizations may only submit one application.

While there are many approaches that can be taken to make data systems more equitable, MADE for Health Justice has made a strategic choice to fund non-profit organizations. Non-profit organizations are often trusted third parties that work closely with many different stakeholders, including a variety of government agencies. Non-profit organizations also bring many other strengths to this work: They often have strong community connections, have organizational missions and/or strategic priorities that focus on serving communities of color, and are well-versed in community power building efforts. These characteristics are essential to ensure that efforts to build health-focused local data ecosystems center the needs and voices of communities that have been oppressed by structural racism.

For the purposes of the MADE for Health Justice initiative, a government entity is an agency, office, department, or program, that is part of a government entity, as defined by the U.S. Internal Revenue Service.

Yes, a government entity could be proposed as a team member on more than one application. However, if an applicant organization is aware of other applicants in their geographic location, they are encouraged to consider combining their applications, particularly if they believe it would result in a stronger application.

Application Process

Phase 1 applications are due on August 31, 2022, at 11:59 PM Eastern Time.

The Phase 1 application scoring criteria and rubric are listed in the Call for Applications.

Up to 20 applications will be advanced to Phase 2 of the application process.

Letters of support are required from each government entity that represents the minimum two sectors that must be represented on a proposed team. A letter of support is also required from a community power building organization if the applicant organization does not engage in this work. Letters of support from government entities should describe how they have been engaged in previous meaningful collaborations with the applicant organization and specific resource commitments (e.g., staff time, funding) that they will provide to support and sustain the work of the initiative during the grant period and beyond. Letters of support from the community power building organization should describe examples of their power building activities, previous meaningful collaborations with the applicant organization, and how they would support the applicant organization and the proposed initiative.

It is unlikely that more than one award would be made to two or more organizations that serve the same local geographic area. If multiple applicants within the same geographic location learn that they are applying for this opportunity, they are encouraged to consider combining their applications, particularly if it would result in a stronger application overall.

Unfortunately, due to the anticipated volume of applications, staff from the MADE for Health Justice national coordinating office will not be able to speak with Phase 1 applicants. However, questions can be submitted to info@madeforhealthjustice.org. Emails will generally receive a response within two business days.

A complete Phase 1 application should include:

  • A complete application form, including a Phase 1 Narrative Statement that has been submitted as a written statement OR as a video link(s).
  • Letters of support from government entities from at least two sectors.
  • A letter of support from a community power building organization (if the applicant organization does not engage in this work).
  • Biographical sketches of each core staff member from the applicant organization and the government entities that will work directly on the initiative.

The Phase 1 application does not require that a budget be submitted. A budget and budget narrative will only be required of applicants that are advanced to Phase 2.

Team Composition & Commitment

Health is multidimensional and intertwined with multiple systems and aspects of life – including economics, education, housing, and transportation. Government agencies are often the owners of data systems that can be used to track measures of community health. They also govern how and for what purposes information from these data systems is produced. Simultaneously, government agencies have perpetuated structural racism, particularly through public and organizational policies, processes, and decisions. For all these reasons, the involvement of government agencies is critical to any fundamental systems change. Creating and sustaining health-focused local data ecosystems will require building connections between the many data systems that reflect drivers of community health and well-being. It will also require sustained connections and engagement between non-profit organizations, local governments, and communities of color to ultimately use data to drive just decision-making.

An applicant organization should have a direct and established relationship with at least two government entities that are included as team members in their application. Applications will be assessed on the degree to which a proposed team of organizations has content expertise, has connections to data needed for the ecosystem, and has been engaged in previous meaningful collaborations together.

A proposed team must include, at minimum:

  1. A non-profit organization that will serve as the applicant organization; and
  2. Local government entities (e.g., agencies, departments, programs) that represent at least two (2) different sectors that will serve as contributors of local, population-based data and/or analytical services to the initiative.

While participation from local government entities across two different sectors is the minimum requirement, a proposed team should include all organizations needed to make the initiative successful and sustainable. Teams can be composed of a variety of other public and private organizations as determined by the applicant.

Yes, the two government entities may be from the same government agency, but they must represent different sectors. Specific sectors of interest for this opportunity include:

  • City, county, regional, and Tribal management
  • Civic engagement and participation
  • Community development
  • Economics, income, taxes, and wealth
  • Education
  • Housing
  • Labor and employment
  • Land use, planning, zoning, and the built environment
  • Legal and carceral systems
  • Public health
  • Transportation and public transit

Data that are essential for the proposed initiative must be available and authorized for use for the purpose of the initiative when the application is submitted.

If selected for this opportunity, awardees (i.e., core staff from the applicant organization and the government entities that work directly on the initiative) agree to the following:

  • Training and Learning: Awardees will receive an array of learning opportunities (e.g., workshops, trainings, convenings), as well as customized technical assistance based on their preferences and needs. Awardees will be required to participate in all learning activities organized by the national coordinating office. By accepting a grant, awardees agree to participate in full. These opportunities may be offered virtually and/or in-person, and awardees should plan to dedicate four hours per month to these training and learning activities. Awardees should expect to complete readings related to racism, equity, power shifting, and justice and to participate in group conversations about these topics that may push them beyond their comfort zones. Additionally, to support the sustainability of this initiative beyond the grant period, awardees may also be trained to facilitate workshops and conversations that they will participate in through this opportunity.
  • Check-ins and Reporting: Awardees will be expected to participate in brief, recurring check-ins with staff from the national coordinating office and to submit narrative and financial reports at least annually.
  • Communications: Awardees will be expected to support and inform ongoing communications activities, including (but not limited to) promotional emails, blogs, videos, and social media posts.
  • Evaluation: A long-term goal of this grant opportunity is to identify pathways for creating local health-focused data ecosystems across the nation that center anti-racism, equity, justice, and community power. To this end, the de Beaumont Foundation and RWJF will be working with external evaluators to document learnings from awardees’ experiences throughout the grant period and up to two years beyond the grant period. Awardees will be expected to participate in evaluation activities throughout this time frame as requested. Elements of the evaluation that are made public will maintain the confidentiality of all contributors. Narratives and ideas shared in evaluation reports will be shaped and co-created along with awardees.
  • Site Visits: To support awardees’ work, staff from the national coordinating office, technical assistance partners, and evaluators will conduct 1-2 day, in-person site visits with awardees during the grant period. The purpose of these visits will be to learn together, connect with awardees’ communities and partners, and understand what more is needed to enhance and sustain their work. These site visits will be co-planned in partnership with awardees.